The 3 Questions To Ask Yourself Before Any Presentation

The 3 Questions To Ask Yourself Before Any Presentation

Everyone has to do presenting from time to time. It can be in a formal setting, it could be an interview, or it could simply be in a meeting – and if it’s in a meeting it might not actually be a presentation – it could be you just want to make a point. 

 

In any form of public speaking situations asking yourself these 3 questions beforehand could get you everything you want! 

 

  1. What do I want out of this? 

Setting our own bar is vital before any presentation. When you establish the point you want to make, and what you want the outcome to be for you, then you can control the content of the presentation and be confident with it. 

     

       2. What do I want them to remember? 

This is about making sure your audience walks away with one clear message. And it ensures that when you are presenting you can make sure your theme shines through, 

     

         3. Who am I speaking to? 

Years ago I heard Alec Baldwin say on his podcast “Here’s The Thing…” that when he interviewed people he always thought about who they were, and what they would be expecting?  

 

In his case, he was thinking that if he was interviewing a huge record label boss versus a politician, versus a comedian, he might ask his questions in a certain way, or think of experiences he could relate to with them. 

 

You can make some simple assumptions about the person you are going to attempt to connect with. For example, if you know the audience will all be lawyers you can make some assumptions about what is important to them that day. Or if you are going for a meeting with a CEO you can assume they are busy and not waste your time getting to your point. 

 

These three questions never fail to help my clients through sticky situations, the content they are unsure about sharing or meetings they are nervous about. So if you are in a similar situation – these 3 questions will not let you down. 

“I Love Myself” and other Self Talk Game Changers

“I Love Myself” and other Self Talk Game Changers

I truly believe that being a great communicator can change your world – and that includes the way you talk to yourself. 

 

We all have the evil inner critic that is quick to be hard on ourselves. For some, it is louder than others. For me, it’s sometimes not even a voice, just a feeling that I can’t, or I shouldn’t, or I won’t be able to. 

 

I come across negative self talk all the time from my clients. The radio presenter who thinks they will sound cheesy if they say something, the TV broadcaster who doesn’t think they can talk to their boss about the future because they won’t want to hear it, the business owner who doesn’t think they can stand on a stage and tell their story. Most of all, when you are putting yourself out there it is really easy to tell yourself that you aren’t good enough and that all you have to do is get through the presentation. 

 

The result is exactly that – a mediocre, forgettable presentation. 

 

Henry Ford once said “The man who thinks he can, and the man who thinks he can’t, is usually right”. 

 

Here are the 3 tips I give to change the self-talk: 

 

  1. “I love myself” 

This is simple. In your quiet moments, get into the habit of repeating the words just say ‘I love myself, I love myself…” in my head. In Barry McDonagh’s book “The DARE Response” this is the advice he gives as the culmination of all the reading he has done. This is the one way that you can change your self-talk and the way you feel about yourself. (Read the book too – it’s excellent). 

 

I have suggested this to friends and clients, some of them say that they don’t believe it, or that it sounds tinny and thin when they hear it. 

 

It’s hard to convince yourself you are worthy of your own love when you have spent so much time bashing yourself. So just keep repeating it. The tinny and weak sounds become healthy and more real. 

 

You can’t give what you haven’t got, and so when you believe in yourself it is easier to put yourself “out there” and speak. 

     2. Change Your Story (with help from Gratitude) 

Our thoughts are the stories we have told ourselves about the experiences we have had, or are having. It’s hard to change an experience, but you can change your story. On top of that (if you are struggling with how to change that story), starting with gratitude is a great way to ground your thoughts so that you can make that change. 

 

I do a lot of CrossFit and recently the sessions have included running. I am always a slow runner. In fact, whenever running comes up on the board I say to myself ‘ugh I am a terrible runner”. This week we had a session where we had to do 4, 800-metre runs (interspersed with 25 overhead squats!). 

 

On the first run, my head said “ugh I am a terrible runner, why are you doing this, you’re never going to finish this session in the time” and I felt sluggish, rubbish and slow. I looked at the clock and decided there was no way that I would make the 25-minute time cap. 

 

Halfway through the second run I had a word with myself: “yes you are a slow runner, but you are not a terrible runner – change this self-talk please”. So I changed it to say “I am grateful for my legs – I am so lucky I can run” and (because I was getting very tired!) I shortened it to “Can run, Good runner” every step! 

 

After the 4th run, I made it over the line at 24 minutes and 59 seconds!  

 

By changing my self-talk and committing to it – a hideous experience was made a lot better: I completed the session and in the time as well. It all started with gratitude. 

 

  1. Take down the thoughts 

In the book, The Artist’s Way, Julia Cameron gives some great advice around quelling the inner critic in our head. 

 

Her technique is to write down the negative thought she calls it the “blurt” – eg “You are not good enough at that to do this”. And then turn it into a positive thought, an “affirmation”. 

 

Even better you might want to take the negative thought, and try writing 5 affirmations against it. 

 

It always strikes me that our inner critic can be so mean! You would never tell someone else the things that your inner critic says to you. So be kind to yourself, back yourself and defend yourself. 

 

Everyone has the inner critic. Everyone. 

 

Before every talk, workshop or session I do, my inner critic has told me that this is going to be awful and that everyone will know this already, that I am not telling them anything new so what’s the point? But I fight through it, I change the story and I defend myself against the thoughts. Mostly I say “I can do this” or “I love myself” and then, I get a thrill from reading the feedback forms at the end of the sessions. 

 

How To Get People To Do What You Want

How To Get People To Do What You Want

There are, of course, many elements that have to come together in order for people to do what you want. One of those elements lies in the language you choose to instruct them.  

 

When my kids were little, I went on an “Incredible Years” parenting course, not just because there was a free creche and I got a break – honest! Mainly because my neighbour had done the course and her son was so well behaved! He did everything she asked him to do. 

 

I HAD to know her secret. 

 

So I went on the course. And here is what I learned: 

 

Ask people to do what you want them to do. 

 

  1. Speak in the positive 

 

Why? Because your unconscious mind hears positive instruction. 

 

When you see a child carrying a glass of water, and they are tottering towards a table, and it looks like they are going to spill it, what do you hear their parents say? 

 

“Don’t spill the water!!” 

 

Your brain doesn’t hear the “Don’t” – especially when you are a kid. And more often than not you can guarantee that that child will actively spill the water. That’s what they think they’ve been told to do. 

 

Asking people what you want them to do (rather than what you don’t want them to do) has real results. When we learned this Mr C and I got really creative with the kids: 

 

“Keep your feet on the floor!” when they thought climbing on things was OK and it wasn’t. 

 

“Put your hands on your tummy” when we wanted them not to touch anything in the shops. 

 

It worked more than “Don’t touch that” ever did. And the added bonus is that if you ask people to do what you want them to do – it’s easier to reward them for doing it. Creating a great cycle of positive reward! 

            2. Be clear with what you want 

 

That’s it. If you want someone to do something for you then you have to ask them explicitly what it is you want them to do. One thought per instruction. The minute you ask for more than one thing, or you start to clutter the request, people won’t hear it. 

 

Less is 100% more. 

The One Thing All Media Experts Know About Engaging Your Audience

The One Thing All Media Experts Know About Engaging Your Audience

I looked up at the audience to see them on their phones or staring at the ceiling and one of them doing some emails. They were bored. I had lost them.

 

I knew why.

 

I was reading them a list of bullet points from a screen. I hadn’t put the effort into the one thing I always put effort into, because, I was supply teaching, standing in for someone else.

I had fallen into the biggest trap by mistake. I had forgotten the golden rule about engaging the audience.

 

Content FIRST. Platform second.

 

When it comes to marketing or speaking, or spreading a message to anyone, or any form of communication, it’s easy to become obsessed with the platform.

 

You feel the pressure of standing on the stage, or you get thinking about which platforms people will see your ad on… but it’s the CONTENT that comes first.

 

Sounds obvious right? well, It’s not! Because it even took broadcast media quite a while to suss it out too.

About fifteen years ago I was in the depths of working in Radio. Radio: the traditional broadcast medium where we put content together, blasted it out through speakers and people listened – there was no other choice. Audience engagement was pretty easy.

 

At the time we were starting to rethink how Radio was working. Twitter and Facebook were starting to grow, and we were aware that youtube was starting to be a place people went for information. We sat in a room and decided that it had to evolve and we came up with the idea that we should put the brand of the Radio Station in the middle, and then engage with our audience on as many platforms as possible.

 

This approach worked. This approach stuck.

 

So if you are ever sat in a meeting where someone says “we just need to do some facebook ads” or “we should get some videos on youtube” they are platform gazing, rather than focusing on the content.

 

For content to engage with your audience you need to go through the following 3 steps:

1) What is your point? (Also, what do you want to get out of it?)

2) What do you want your audience to remember, and feel?

3) Who are you talking to? Where are they, and what are they needing?

 

It is only when you’re at that third point do you begin to work out what platform will work best and how you tweak it to the platform.

My mistake was to try and deliver someone else’s content without thinking “what is MY point?” or what did I want them to remember? I was just worried that the powerpoint slides made sense. And because of that – I lost the audience.

 

Never again!

 

If you are communicating in any way: Content First, Platform Second.

Flattery Gets You Everywhere

Flattery Gets You Everywhere

When it comes to asking something from someone – whether it be a colleague or a peer or a new business prospect – it is so tempting to just ask for what you want. If you have ever started to wonder why you aren’t getting what it is you are asking for, or it feels like no one is listening – try this one tool.

 

Pay them a compliment.

 

In what is considered the bible of persuasion, one of the big ideas in Dale Carnegie’s “How To Win Friends Influence People” is: “Begin in a friendly way”

 

Do you know anyone that doesn’t like receiving a compliment?

 

Can you think of a time when you didn’t like receiving a compliment?

 

Recently I was asking for some help with a client. The people I asked were very busy people and often I would expect an answer to take about 2 weeks. But this time I changed my approach. I asked for their help and explicitly told them that I really valued their opinion, that they were always brilliant at this sort of thing, and that they were the first people I had thought of.

 

I got answers from them all within 24 hours.

 

I genuinely believe what I wrote. It’s just that in the past I would have assumed they knew that I felt that way, which is why I was asking. Either that or the cynic in me would often think “they are going to know I am sucking up to them and they won’t believe me”.

 

The thing with compliments is that we rarely say them out loud.

 

And, the truth is – you can improve every single relationship you are in or entering into if you articulate your kind thoughts towards that person.

 

So from this minute on, if you can say something nice – say it. I know you will be brilliant at it.

 

3 Reasons Why Public Speaking Will Change Your Life

3 Reasons Why Public Speaking Will Change Your Life

There is no doubt that whenever anyone has to approach speaking in public the nerves set in. Countless articles and books have been written about the ways to beat the nerves, and how to create the perfect presentation. But I wanted to focus in on the “why”. “Why” is it so important to be good at public speaking today, more than ever before.

 

       1)You Will Build Resilience and Grow In Confidence

 

The first time I was in a position of doing a talk that “really mattered” I was so nervous I couldn’t speak to anyone for days. I was afraid of forgetting my lines. I was afraid no one would think anything of what I had to say. I was afraid that I was going to be thought of as all sizzle and no sausage. I felt sick.

 

Then I did the talk.

 

It went really well. Like super well.

 

Nowadays the nerves still come whenever I talk, but I am more confident. I built some resilience to the nerves.

 

After attending one of my Speaker Courses, Clare saw me at an event and said to me “Kate, I went for a job interview after the course, and I decided to just be me, and be confident. On the first question I answered really assertively – and just said what I thought. I would never have done that before the course! I didn’t just get the job, I got offered a better job because of my answer to the first question”

 

If you can beat your fear of speaking in public – you can do anything.

 

       2) You Will Be A Better Communicator In Day to Day Life

 

Great communication is a skill. It requires thought and practice. The thing is that we rarely think of it as a skill, and think of it as something we can all just “do”, and therefore we don’t apply any thought or practice.  Especially when our key way to communicate today is via text or WhatsApp.

 

Speaking in public whether on stage, or podcast or on a youtube channel, will make you a better communicator in your day to day life, because you have to think about what you are saying and how your message is being received.

 

I helped a client start a podcast about 3 years ago. His podcast is on sport, his job is as a surveyor. He commented to me about a year in that he had noticed the impact of the podcast on his working life. He said “Having to form arguments and opinions on a weekly basis on the podcast means I am able to form stronger arguments at work. I am much less fearless about speaking up, and I am better at making a clear point”

 

       3) You Will Become An Authority (and More Persuasive As A Result)

 

There are 2 things that make you successful:

  1. Be good at what you do
  2. Make sure people know about it

 

I have a friend who is a brilliant teacher. He covered a role while a colleague was on maternity leave for a year, did a brilliant job and then went for the role full time. In the interview, he assumed that they realised that he had done a good job, and so didn’t feel the need to tell stories or explain in detail what he had done.

 

He didn’t get the job.

 

When you stand up in public and tell people stories about what you do, and what you do well, you automatically become an authority on what you do.

 

When I did my talk to my industry I went from “person who could do a good job” to “person people knew did that job well”. In fact from that talk I found the confidence, and the authority, to launch a business to coach presenters.

 

The world is noisy. The world has its face in social media. The world is getting automated all the time. Being a good communicator is essential to you being able to achieve your goals – and getting good at public speaking is one of the ways that you can achieve this.

 

You can find out more details of my public speaking course “Speaker In 6” here.

Less Is More: 3 Tips on Editing for Impact

Less Is More: 3 Tips on Editing for Impact

Commercial Radio Presenters have always known the pressure of being allowed to talk, for only a certain time. Over the years it has been my job to get the most out of a presenter that has to talk for only 2 minutes. Or 30 seconds. Or 10 seconds. Or 3 seconds.

 

In that time it’s a radio presenter’s job to get you to listen for 15 minutes more (this is to do with how audience figures are collated). It’s not easy.

 

Now many presenters struggled, complaining that they couldn’t get the story in in-that time. I spent many hours and days explaining that in that short time they should be thinking “what CAN I do?” Rather than “What can’t I get done?” There is nothing like a time limit to make you self edit – but self-editing is hard.

 

Then one day a presenter who had been resistant, bounded up to me and with a real glint in his eye said: “Kate! I listened to my Friday show and I tell you what, this shorter link thing is amazing. When you hear my voice it’s like, boom!”

 

He clapped his hands together “Impact!”

 

Joy.

 

Making every word count is not a new concept, Mark Twain said: “I’m sorry this letter is long, but I didn’t have the time to make it short”. And the Twitter age has had us working out how to edit our complex emotions down to 140/250 characters for some time now.

 

It’s still not easy. So here are some tips to self edit your content.

 

  1. Remove all mitigating language

Too many words get in the way of your message.

 

When you look at a painting the warmer colours (yellows, oranges, reds) attract the eye first. So if you want the eye drawn to a certain part of the canvas you paint some red in that spot. But if you paint the whole canvas red, it’s just red – and nothing else stands out.

 

Words are the same. Too many words, and too much detail is an ineffective way of getting someone to hear your point. You are saying everything and nothing.

 

The first thing to do is to get rid of any wasted words:

 

Like

So

Basically

I was thinking that

Erm

Does that make sense?

 

Not only do they fill in space that needs to be cleared, but they also undermine your point.

 

  1. Rehearse and hear it back

Nothing beats rehearsal and listening back to spot where an edit is required.

 

Record yourself on your phone, and listen back. Film yourself on your phone, and watch it back. Even practising in front of another human gets you to hear yourself back.

 

Trust me – you will hear your edit immediately. I usually find myself yelling “oh shush will you” at myself. And then I just hammer out the words.

 

  1. Get to the point as quickly as you can

 

Helen Zaltzman-Austwick is the Queen Of Podcasters. I saw her speak at a live event a couple of years ago and she advised the audience of eager podcast makers: “Start as late in the story as possible”.

 

The biggest mistake people make is to over explain the set up and give too much context. The story doesn’t start with the set up, it starts with the problem. The set up literally gives your audience the reason to keep listening to you.

 

It’s the same with any point you wish to make. Never make your boss wait 45 minutes before you deliver the point of your presentation. Get into your point as soon as you can.

 

Use these three tips to be heard, and create an impact in these noisy times.

Sell yourself in one line (without sounding like a show off)

Sell yourself in one line (without sounding like a show off)

The One Thing You Can Do To Stick In People’s Minds

In the last blog, I bust some myths around networking – the theme being that you don’t need to make it about you, and in fact, you should make it all about the person you are speaking to.

In fact, there is ONE thing you can do that means you can make sure people know how you can help them.

The most classic question you will get at a networking event or in any new meeting is: “what do you do?”

Most people answer with their job title. “I am an account manager”, “I am a coach”, “I am a sales rep”, “I’m an artist”, “I’m a Managing Director”…

You might know what that means. The person you are speaking to has no idea what that means, or how it impacts them.

Start telling people what it is you do and the impact you have.

In the last blog, it was clear that impactful networking means you are getting people to understand how what you do can help them.

Not only do you have to listen to them, but you also need to be clear about what it is you do.

So you need to have what I call an “Action Impact Liner”.

To do that you need to explain what you do, what is your action:
I help people manage their money…
I run a company that creates handwritten letters on mass…
I teach kids at primary school…  
I sell artworks…

And then explain the impact it has:
So that they can rest easy when they get to bed at night  
So that you can guarantee to get someone’s attention with a personal touch.
So that the future is a better place.
So that people feel good about their house.

Mine is:
“I help people get confident and comfortable speaking in public so that when someone sees you speak they think “I want to work with you”:”

What is your “Action Impact Liner”?  

You can still give your job title “I’m a Presenter Coach – I help people….etc…”

Try writing your Action “Impact Liner” below

I help / make / create / run * insert verb _____________________________

So that  _______________________________________________________________________

When people know what you do, and how you are passionate about helping people, they will then know to call on you when the issue you can help with arises.

3 Myths About Networking That Will Change Your Mind About Networking

3 Myths About Networking That Will Change Your Mind About Networking

For a lot of people, the word “networking” is an evil word. That feeling of meeting people and selling yourself sounds hideous. Haunted by negative self-talk like “they aren’t going to want to hear about me”, or “it’s all so fake”, or “I’m just not smart enough”, many run for the door as soon as networking is mentioned.

 

The reality is, that nowadays, there is no job in the world, that doesn’t require you to sell your business. Building relationships is vital to any career, or business because people work with people they know, like and trust.

 

Networking doesn’t have to be an uncomfortable experience and the whole concept of building relationships is shrouded with myths.

 

Let’s bust through a few:

 

Myth 1: Networking is only done at events and meetings

When you say “networking” to someone the immediate picture is standing in a group of people at an event awkwardly trying to work out when to introduce yourself.

 

Yes, networking events are important, but you can “network” in your own way, space and time as well. You can arrange to meet people for coffee. You can meet people through Linkedin. And in fact you are networking all the time. The people that you work with right now, will possibly be your boss one day, or they’ll go to a great new job and may recommend you.

 

One thing that helps is understanding what type of communicator you are as you can then play to your strengths. Take this iMA Strategies quiz to discover how you can be better at networking: http://katecocker-ima.com

 

Myth 2: Networking only counts if you are meeting new people

When I started both my Presenter Coach Business and Kate Cocker Studio (where I sold my artwork and paintings) I realised that actually where the connections start, are with the people you know. Friends would be the first to buy my paintings, and I still get Presenter Coach work through people I play netball with.

 

Start with who you know, make a list. Then see who they know. And make sure your friends and family, know what it is you actually do so that they can employ you or recommend you.

 

Myth 3: Networking means talking about myself or the business constantly, and I am not good at that

This is the greatest pressure people put on themselves when they think about networking. But you can take the pressure off right now as here is the secret to being a good networker:

 

All you have to do is listen.

 

Think about the people you know that you consider to be good listeners. Do you dislike them? No. Do you respect them? Yes. Do you trust them? Yes.

 

Listening is key to building relationships and business development. Finding out what are the challenges for their business, gives you the opportunity to help them. You can’t help without listening, being interested and asking questions about the things they are talking about.

 

Take the light off you, and make sure you shine the light on them.

 

Sometimes we can build up myths that protect us. Our assumptions protect us from taking risks, feeling uncomfortable and bursting out the comfort zone. Sometimes we don’t have to jump in 2 footed and terrify ourselves, sometimes we can stretch our comfort zone and slowly build confidence that we know what we are doing.

 

So network to your strengths, start with who you already know, and listen so that you can work out how what you do can help the person you are talking to.

 

There is one more element to networking that will help you get that new gig, or client. I will reveal all in my next blog.

One Tool To Get Everyone To Hear You: iMA Strategies

One Tool To Get Everyone To Hear You: iMA Strategies

Have you ever noticed that some people just seem to get you on side really easily, where some just wind you up?  Keep reading and take the iMA quiz!                             

 

Have you ever wondered why that person you work with just isn’t listening to you and doing as you ask?

 

Wouldn’t it be amazing if you felt you actually did understand your boss?

 

And what about the guy who never reads your emails? (For reference I am that guy that rarely makes it to the end of an email).

 

I am constantly on a mission to unhook snags like these for my clients (and for me!), so I recently trained as an iMA Strategies Affiliate.

 

iMA Strategies is a simple tool designed by Founder James Knight. iMA suggests that there are 4 types of communicators – denoted by how open and assertive they are. They are all colour coded.

 

Simply:

High Blue – Open and Non-Assertive – loves bringing people together and creating teams, is usually a good right-hand man/woman but will feel uncomfortable making decisions or making the first move.

High Yellow – Open and Assertive – likes people, playful, distractible, not worried about detail, quick decision maker, and usually the last one up at a party

 

High Red – Closed and Assertive – likes detail but only what they need to know, likes getting things done, not so fussed about spending lots of time with lots of people, people can drain their energy.

 

High Green – Closed and Non-Assertive – likes detail, a lot. Likes processes a lot. Likes getting things done. Does not enjoy spending time with lots of people because they feel drained of energy.

 

In our most comfortable state, we fall more into one of these categories. If you know what colour you are, you can work out how to communicate better with someone of a different colour.

 

For example, I am High Blue, which means in my most comfortable state I like being in rooms full of people, but I am not a very good instigator. I also have to find ways to be a better decision maker. High Reds are good for me, but they read me as not focused enough too much waffle. I have to think about how I speak to High Yellows, to be sure that I am a bit more to the point, and for High Greens, I can lean on details but have to be clear with the process.

 

When we get some idea of which type we are, it’s easier to know what we need, and how to self actualise in order to communicate with other colours. If you are High Green, you can recognise that networking events are your least comfortable place, so either work hard to get good or know to avoid them and find other routes.

 

When presenting this is useful as you probably want to include ways of communicating that hit all 4 types of people. Bright, vibrant and to the point for the High Yellow and Reds in the audience, a little more facts and detail for the High Blues and Greens. Story wins all colours of course.

 

Want to know more? This simple test will show you what you are and you’ll get information about how you like to be communicated with, and how you can communicate with the other High Colours. katecocker-ima.com