The Alternative Guide To Networking

The Alternative Guide To Networking

“I love networking”…  said no one ever!

 

The word is enough to send shudders through many people I meet.

 

Whether you like it or not, networking is key to building the relationships that will propel your career.

 

No one will work with you without some level of familiarity and trust, and that can only be achieved through meeting with someone face to face.

 

The biggest things I hear are that; networking feels forced, people never know what to say, and they find the whole thing uncomfortable.

 

On the other hand I quite like networking, I always have, but I didn’t know what I was doing was networking when I started talking to people – because that’s all it is. This list will help you to shift your mindset around networking.

 

  1. Networking Events Are Brilliant

So I need to caveat that even though I like speaking to people, I still struggle with networking events. I am still nervous before making contact. I still hate that uncomfortable moment of approaching someone and saying hello.

 

The reason I think they are brilliant is that those moments are SUPPOSED to be uncomfortable and “awks” but at an event titled “Networking Event” then the whole thing is expected. In fact, by approaching someone at a networking event where you are expected to talk to someone, you are more than likely to be met with the pure relief that they didn’t have to do it. You saved them from the initial awkward moment.

 

So networking events are brilliant because you’re supposed to be having the awkward moment and everyone feels the same. The “awks” moment is forgiven and the chat begins!

      

2. Small Talk Is ACE (Secret: It’s All About The Follow Up Question)

If we continue on the theme of “it’s supposed to be awkward”. And that everyone accepts that small talk is a step to a deeper chat. Then small talk is ace. It leads into the next thing.

 

The small talk question: “What do you do?” Or “what’s keeping you busy at the moment?”. Or “how was your day?”. Is a vehicle into the follow-up question – which is when the conversation actually begins:

 

You: How was your day?

Them: It was good

You: What was good about it? / What was the best thing that happened?

Conversation begins

 

You: What do you do?

Them: I am a barrister

You: Oh whereabouts? / What does that entail?

Conversation begins

 

You: So what’s keeping you busy at the moment?

Them: Actually my kids are a real focus at the moment

You: Oh how many do you have?

Conversation begins

     3. Newsflash: You Don’t Have To Go To An Event

There is an assumption that to network you have to go to events, meet new people or people above you in your career status. Well yes, this is a good assumption. But. In my career, the opportunities have come from those people I have been working with over the years. My peers, my colleagues and my friends.

 

You are actually networking all the time.

 

I network in many ways. I have got work from joining a netball team. I will often ask people to go for a coffee just me and them. I will meet someone through a client and that will lead to more work. One of the benefits of my podcast is that I get to meet more people. I met one client after she replied to an Instagram post, and I followed it up while I was on a beach in Greece.

 

Networking can take on the form you choose – which means you are in control of how it happens and you can do it on your terms. The key outcome of networking is to create trusting connections, that form business relationships. Not every conversation will end there, you don’t know the outcome of the conversations. But. You do know the outcome if you avoid meeting people.

 

Keeping It Up

Keeping It Up

“Be bigger with your arms” I said as my client was trying out her performance.

She moved her hands up with her elbows almost stuck to her sides.

“No bigger” hoping that she would open up her arms wide

She moved her hands out to the side and kept her elbows glued to her sides.

“Ha! Bigger than that – hold your arms to the side”

 

She started laughing, feeling the vulnerability, but she raised her arms and spoke her line and that was when she became the leader she should be.

 

Whether you are on stage, on screen or on air – the performance space shrinks you.

 

I always tell my clients that in the performance space you need to be vintage you plus 10% or more if you’ve got it.

 

That means you need to be a tiny bit bigger, louder, more vibrant than you are on a Friday night.  And keeping that energy up throughout your performance is tough.

 

As a presenter you are like the ringmaster – your energy can change the room, and people always remember how you make them feel.

 

Here are my 5 tips to keeping up your energy:

 

  1. Use Your Body

Just like your brain can send messages to your body, your body can do the same to your brain, and most importantly your mouth!

 

I was working with a presenter who, when I said “what can you do to build your energy here?” said “well I could stand up…”.

 

Sit forward or stand up – your body will tell your brain to be more urgent and active, and in turn, you will have greater charisma and energy. Even if you are on the radio, be expressive with your arms and your face as this will increase your “follow the leader” vibe (eg your audience will want to come with you).

 

It might be that before you start speaking you do your Wonder Woman Pose, or get big, or even get your heart rate up by jumping up and down. You’ll be surprised how your vocal tone follows.

            2.Use Your Voice

Your voice will give your energy away. I used to hear Mr C on the radio in the early days and I could hear when he was tired!

 

I think we can agree that low and monotonous vocal tone sounds very boring and will lose your audience. When you are tired your mouth also stops pronouncing your words – as if your lips get lazy!

 

Asking presenters to put more energy into their work means they can stumble on the following trip-ups. The first is talking too fast. More energy means more energy – not to talk like a Duracell Bunny! So remember to stay well paced. The second is that you end up just shouting. And probably monotonously.

 

The best for vocal tone is to remember your voice has a lot of pitches or tones within it and you can use them all in your presentation. Initially try starting sentences with emphasis and high pitched and then working “down the stairs” as you finish the sentence.

          3. It Should Feel Corny

Whenever I ask presenters to be “grander” in their presentation, they find themselves feeling like they are using “obvious” language, and they feel really corny in their delivery.

 

I want you to consider 2 things.

 

Firstly – the obvious is there for a reason. Opening your best man’s speech with a well delivered “Ladies and Gentlemen” is a well trodden path for a reason: it works.

 

Secondly – getting comfortable with cliche is the first step to finding your own voice. Sometimes you have to open the door to the the cringe, to find what’s the other side. If you refuse to be cliche or a bit cringe from time to time, you are unlikely to find your own true voice. Treat it as part of the process.

               4. You Don’t Know There Till You Go There

Rehearsal is the space where you discover your style. Use rehearsal time to try new things, and the things you are afraid of.

 

If you are terrified of moving your arms from your waist then try rehearsing with your hands above your head. If you are feeling shy, rehearse your talk by acting out “being really confident”, you’ll be surprised what you find.

 

These are my favourite moments of any of my presentation courses – the moment where a client finds their power and their energy. It’s a truly amazing moment when they let out the giggle of vulnerability, and then go for it. It’s like they light up! This moment never happens in an unprepared performance. It only happens when you push through some of your worries in your rehearsal time.

               5. Prepare and Protect Your Energy

Performing can be tiring for some people. I know that when I am booked to do a talk, or when I am recording my podcast, not only do I ensure that I am eating and exercising well in the build up, I also make sure I book in some down time afterwards.

 

I learned this from one of the presenters I worked with at the BBC. I noticed they were deliberately booking in their rest time after any performance. They were one of the most consistent presenters I have worked with.

 

Another radio presenter I work with acknowledged that the quick drink after work on a Friday was affecting their Saturday performance and they were frustrated by that. They got sick of walking out of the studio feeling like they’d not been entirely on their game. They felt like they let their listener down

 

Your audience needs you on your A-Game. In fact they need for you to generate the energy they are lacking, through your energetic performance! Make caring for your energy levels a habit.

 

Engage Your Audience: The One Way To Get Them On Side.

Engage Your Audience: The One Way To Get Them On Side.

Ever had that feeling that your point is just not being heard?

 

Once a week Mr.C, the kids and I go for “Family Breakfast”. This week my son needed to do his maths homework while we were waiting for food to arrive. His head was in maths when my husband said: “Mate, we have got to sort out your handwriting”.

 

(For context – his teachers over the last year or so have said this is something he could do with working on)

 

The 11-year-old immediately went on the defensive and the usual bickering then ensued.

 

The outcome? Our son won’t be changing his handwriting any time soon. My husband is frustrated that yet again he’s not been heard. And in a few weeks time, the same thing will happen again. In short – no one benefits and nothing changes.

 

Getting someone to buy into your point is something we have to do every day, whether you are on air, on screen, on stage, in a meeting, or just trying to get the other half to empty the bins.

 

And this one technique never fails: start by acknowledging your audience’s reality.

 

You know yourself that no one is going to change your mind about anything if they start talking to you while your head is in something else. And if you’re anything like me, my head is constantly in something.

 

Acknowledging the reality of the person you’re talking to allows their brain to come to you before you start getting into what it is you want to ask of them.

 

At Home:

So if my husband had taken this tack:

 

“Is that your maths homework? How are you getting on with it?”

 

He would have engaged our son immediately. And after listening he may have been able to weave the conversation to something like:

 

“You know your teachers were talking about you improving your handwriting? Have you been working on it at all?”  

 

“It’s just I can’t help but notice that you’re still struggling to get it neat – is there anything we can do to help it get better?”

 

Yes, it takes a little longer, but it has great results.

 

In Work/Life:

I had a builder that wasn’t answering my calls once, we had discovered a leak as a result of some work he had done, and I needed it fixing. He wasn’t returning my calls, and then I left this message:

 

“Hi. I know you’re likely to be super busy and the last thing you want is this old work to come back to haunt you, so if you could give me a call we can get it off your plate and out your hair as soon as possible”

 

He called me before the end of the day.

 

In Presentations:

On stage you often see comedians start their sets by commenting on the location, whether that be the room itself or whether that be the town.

 

You can do the same in your presentation with something called a “Yes Set”. This is a simple technique that encourages the audience to agree with you too.

 

“I know you want to get home on time today”

Audience brain: “yes”

“And that you have seen a lot of people today”

Audience brain: “yes”

“So let me get straight to the point…”

Audience brain “yes”

 

On Air:

The challenge is that you can’t see what your audience is doing, so really you are guessing as to their reality at the moment they are listening!

 

Sometimes it’s safe to assume. Often acknowledging your listeners’ reality is in capturing the time of day and the sense of the day. Saying hello and letting them know where they are, also acknowledges that that is their reality (eg “this is station FM / the pod podcast”).

 

Taking the time to introduce a topic with the listener experience is a clear way to ensure you are acknowledging their reality.

 

Rather than saying “There is a survey this morning that says meat is bad for you, so we have an expert here to talk about the challenge of getting people to stop eating it”

 

You might say “Imagine you are happily tucking into your favorite food, for someone to tell you that it’s significantly worse for you – would that stop you from eating it?”

Where Do Ideas Come From?

Where Do Ideas Come From?

Content Ideas are the elixir of any regular Content Creator: when you have them it’s easy to create amazing content, when you don’t it’s hard work.

Firstly – let me clear this up – you are a Content Creator if you are presenting to anyone about anything on any platform. So yes, that’s you.

 

Now for the ‘hard work’ part.

 

When I run out of ideas, I don’t just run out of ideas and think “it’s OK Kate, you’re just having a bad day”… I have a catastrophic crisis of confidence.

 

Last week I sat down to write this blog…with nothing. I put it off for 3 days and nothing came to me. I then thought about not writing it at all. Then the evil inner voice started telling me that this was always going to happen, that inside you’ve known all along that you’re not really that good at this and everyone is going to find out. Then I had an adult tantrum, had some gin and went to bed.

 

I finally talked to my colleague who said “what about a blog about coming up with ideas?”

 

Which shook me out of my strop to go through the process I always go through (and had forgotten) when I need inspiration for new ideas.

 

  1. Use Your Life

I say this all the time. Finding the best way to connect with your audience is to find a common bond. And the most basic common bond is that we are all human. What makes us human? : The personal, the quirks, the niggles, the crazy, the silly and the obsessive. Loves, hates, passions, relationships, and emotions.

 

Look at what has happened to you recently to pull out some stories from there. Dig deep. If it helps, comedian Steve Martin suggests sitting in a coffee shop for 3 hours and making a note of all the things you see, think and feel. That should be plenty to get you started!

         2.Get Topical

On the search for inspiration, sometimes the outside world can help. When I record my Everyday Positivity Flash Briefing I record 5-10 at a time. I keep a note of significant dates, events, film releases, TV shows, birthdays, anniversaries and use them in my content.

 

I did a whole 2-minute episode about how I love mountains because they are something that you view from far away, and if we look at our life from far away, maybe it would look just as great! I do genuinely think this but the content starter for it? It’s International Mountain Day that day.

 

While topicality can create ideas, it is mostly useful for relevance. For example, I talked about Black Friday as an example of using positive language on the 23rd November 2018 Black Friday episode. The episode was about using “and” rather than “but”, with the punchline “I bought loads of amazing things in the Black Friday sales AND I saved a load of money”…

 

            3. Do a Mind Map

 

No really. Just get writing.

 

I love a mind map, but I like to do them on my own! I relax my mind and the start listing ideas. Then I add associations, then opposites and then more associations and opposites and it usually throws up something I’d not thought of.

             4. What does your audience NEED?

The best content is the content that adds value to your audience. I have heard the words “pain points” being bandied around recently in business. Find your client’s “pain point” and then give them a solution for that, is the advice. I guess the best thing to do is be useful to them.

 

And sometimes just asking your audience for what they need can create the best content. What do they struggle with? What would they like to know?

 

When all else fails though – I will always recommend sleeping on it.

 

You know the idea that comes to you in the shower or on the sunbed – there’s a scientific reason for it. You need to let your brain state drift and it will pop ideas in.

 

Last week when I did the Content Mind Map I slept on it, and then while driving the following morning last week’s blog about Script Reading popped into my head!

 

So maybe fill yourself up with inspiration and then have a lie-down!