Script Or No Script

Script Or No Script

Here’s the thing: people can tell when you are reading.

I should caveat that with: people can tell when you are reading unless you have done the work to be sure you don’t sound like you are reading.

 

My personal preference is that you should go without a script where you can, but the reality is that you will be reading a script at some point.

 

So if you are going to read from a script – how do you sound like you are talking rather than reading??

 

  1. Check the Words

This is key to it sounding like you aren’t reading. The aim for all presenting is that you sound like you’re talking to your audience as if you were in the pub plus 10%. The language you use to write is significantly different to the spoken word.

 

When we write we use lots of words we don’t need. When we speak we get to the point quicker. We also write in the first person (I / we went to the pub) or the third person (she went to the pub). We we speak we use the first and second person (you).

 

When you write you tend to put descriptions up front and the subject last. When speaking the subject goes up front and then you may add some description after.

 

Written: However, this week the dynamic and hairy lead singer of the Foo Fighters, Dave Grohl, did go to the post office

 

Spoken: “Dave Grohl, the lead singer of the Foo Fighters, went to the post office this week – which was surprising…”

 

It is worth going through your script and checking that it reads in a way that you would actually talk.

 

        2. Read, Read, and Read Again

Chris Anderson says in his book “TED Talks: The official TED guide to public speaking” that most TED speakers write then memorise their talks. The rehearsal process of repetition makes it sound like you are speaking. And this is the case for those that purely rehearse rather than script too.

 

You will need to read a script at least 5 or 6 times before it sounds like it has become part of your spoken word.

        3. Work Out Your Emphasis and Intonation

With reading written word, ironically, you need to put the natural emphasis and intonation back in. When I played the flute in orchestras we were regularly making notes all over our music, and for reading the written word, you need to do the same.

 

There is a fantastic technique called The Hudson Voice Technique, developed by the BBC voice over artist Steve Hudson. His technique includes two elements you can use really easily.

 

Firstly, pause at the end of your sentences (and even more so at the end of your points) and energise the beginning of the next sentence (point).

 

Secondly, mentally break the script up beyond the punctuation. In a sentence you are likely to find a bit of a natural lull every 3 to 4 words, then get your pencil and draw a line in hose breaks. This will help you slow up your reading so you are not racing ahead, and it will get you to think about where the emphasis is in a sentence.

 

Mostly, you need to find your natural voice rather than your natural voice, and to do that you can watch my video about finding your authentic voice here: https://youtu.be/ltnQy744B9g

 

In summary the pros of scripting is that you can remember what you are going to say, you can shorten your prep, and you can even delegate the writing part.

 

I wanted to leave you with this. I used to think that no script for speaking in public was the thing to aim for. Then I saw this great performance from Richard Huntington at Next Radio in 2016 https://youtu.be/8UIVpD5V0Xs and his energy made me wonder if you could do great presenting with a script in your hand.

The One Tool You Have That Will Change Your Life

The One Tool You Have That Will Change Your Life

How do you get your audience to do what you ask?  

What if your audience don’t believe your story?

And have you ever wondered why your other half is defending themselves even before you’ve asked them the simplest question?!

 

The answer is in …..Your Voice

Your impact is defined by how you use your voice, in any environment. Getting it right will change your life.

So, here are some tips to “change your life”

 

1. Pause and Emphasise

There is a technique called the Hudson Technique where you learn to end a sentence, pause, and emphasise the beginning of the next sentence. Letting your thoughts and words run into each other is exactly how to lose your listeners. This is especially true when you are moving between topics. So to keep your listener’s attention you have to start with an energetic word or phrase to indicate “this is new”. And you can use the power of the pause to build up the emphasis.

You will well know that the one thing that gets your attention most these days is silence. Think about what it is that makes you actually look at the radio?!

 

2. Sing Song

Your voice has a natural melody. Except when we are under pressure (like in a talk) we can lose the melody or over use the melody entirely. In his TEDx Talk Vocal Coach Roger Love talks about the fact that staying monotonous means your audience just knows what is coming. He talks about embracing the melody in “going up the stairs” and “coming down the stairs”. How one implies happy, and one implies sad.

You can watch it here: 

 

3. Use Your Face to be Believable

When you are doing a serious pieces: frown and it will make you sound serious. When you are doing a happy piece, or you need energy: smile – you won’t believe the difference in a smile! And then there is just plain believing in what you are saying. The reality is that you will have to talk about something you either don’t really fully understand, or don’t care about. At this point you must deploy self reflection. Engaging with either what you know to be true about what you are talking about, or engaging some empathy around what you are talking about, can help you to believe in what you are saying.

 

4. Self Care

Your voice is a muscle, that is part of your body, and it needs to be cared for. Some people when they get overworked and overtired – it shows in their voice. The vocal cords take a hammering. I’m not suggesting that you start getting all diva honey and lemon over your voice. I am suggesting that you can remember to rest, to stand tall, to allow your lungs the space to breathe, to breathe properly, to stay hydrated and one final tip to keep your vocal cords in check: hum. Hum around the house, and wherever you can. The vibrations are supposed to help keep the muscles strong and lubricated!

 

Use your voice to create impact and engage your audience, and you can sweep them off their feet.